Glossier Adds Traditional Media to Its Makeup Bag

The beauty start-up launches a broadcast TV campaign featuring real-life members of the Glossier community to complement its social media strategy, citing the desire for “an emotional connection at scale.”

You’d be hard-pressed to find a millennial beauty enthusiast these days who doesn’t know about Glossier, one of the biggest direct-to-consumer brands. Well, now those few in the dark may no longer be as the company launches its biggest campaign to date including the brand’s first go at broadcast TV advertising. An article from The Drum fills readers in on Glossier’s marketing moves.

Feeling like Glossier advertising image

The campaign, Feeling Like Glossier, centers on people such as the off-line editor and customers affiliated with the brand and showcases their beauty routines and stories. The spots are accompanied by more information online about the subjects. For example, the “Feeling Like Paloma” spot is only part of the Paloma Elsesser story on Glossier, which, in addition to the video, gives you a text and e-commerce view into the model and body positivity advocate’s beauty philosophy.

For example, the “Feeling Like Paloma” spot is only one part of the Paloma Elsesser section on Glossier, which, in addition to the video, gives you a text and e-commerce view into the model and body positivity advocate’s beauty philosophy.

Beauty marketers have been gravitating toward realness to great reception. For example, CVS is embracing authenticity in beauty marketing: “We want women to buy because they’re living up to a realistic image and it’s making them feel better,” said Norman de Greve, senior vice president and chief marketing officer at CVS Health. For a recent Burt’s Bees campaign, the company pointedly moved away from retouching. As Mariah Eckhardt, vice president of marketing at Burt’s Bees, previously shared with SheReports, “I think that is a really important point in representing the authenticity of the talent that we’re using.” And things get even more real when women direct the campaign, as highlighted in our August 2019 piece “#SeeHer Study Shows Ads Directed by Women Offer More Authentic Portrayals of Women.”

Feeling like Glossier advertising image

The Drum article notes that the 30-second spots will appear on ABC, which is also hosting Glossier-produced content on ABC’s app and website, making it Glossier’s first deal with a U.S. network. According to the company, the reason to use TV as a platform is to create “an emotional connection at scale,” and “reinforce its messaging with existing customers while introducing itself to new ones.” The campaign will also appear on New York City billboards.

Glossier first used Instagram to sell product, making it one of the first cosmetic companies to do so. The majority of its $100 million in annual sales still comes through organic channels. Glossier has also established a physical presence with brick-and-mortar stores, one in New York City and one in Los Angeles; there is a pop-up store in the works. No matter what its next moves are, authenticity will surely continue to inform Glossier’s future.

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